3 Investing Lessons from Richard Pzena - Cabot Wealth Network

3 Investing Lessons from Richard Pzena

I once attended a lecture by Richard Pzena, and was blown away by his investing lessons. Here are three that really grabbed me.

Richard Pzena has taught me a lot about investing.

My favorite investor of all time is Joel Greenblatt.

His claim to fame is he managed a special situations hedge fund, Gotham Capital, which generated 50% gross returns on average for 10 years.

Greenblatt has written many books. My personal favorite is You Can Be a Stock Market Genius, but I’ve read all his books and recommend you do too.

In 2005, Joel Greenblatt taught a class at Columbia Business School. His friend, Richard Pzena, held a guest lecture.

Pzena is a famous value investor in his own right.

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He focuses on deep value investing and founded Pzena Investment Management, a firm with over $50 billion in assets under management.

Pzena’s lecture highlighted three key investing lessons which are critical to his process.

Richard Pzena Investing Lesson #1: Reversion to the Mean

Markets project current trends long into the future. That’s why fast-growing businesses are often overvalued. At the same time, businesses that stop growing, for whatever reason, get sold off harshly. This happens to the greatest businesses.

In 2018, Apple (AAPL) shares dropped over 35%. Why? Because the market was uncertain about Apple’s future growth. Suddenly, the market couldn’t project big growth numbers into the future anymore. It overreacted and punished Apple’s stock price.

And those are the opportunities for rational and patient investors. Stocks that grew extraordinarily fast will revert to their mean over time, resulting in less growth. Stocks that underperformed their potential will revert to their mean over time, resulting in more growth.

Richard Pzana Investing Lesson #2: Ignore Catalysts

“Once you can see a catalyst, you are late.” – Richard Pzena

You can’t make money with information that everyone has. Let’s use the Apple example again. When Apple fell off their trend, you could’ve bought the business for 10x earnings.

But this opportunity was available because there was uncertainty. If you wait for the next earnings call, and earnings are on trend again, the price will quickly re-rate. Instead, evaluate the business right now. Would you buy Apple for 10x earnings even if growth slows down permanently?

Warren Buffett did. Eventually, Apple did get back on track – both the business and the stock price. While the stock is up many times since then, the upside wasn’t the crucial factor here. It was the limited downside that made the investment so attractive.

Richard Pzena Investing Lesson #3: Temporary or Permanent

This way of investing relies on one thing: You find out whether the reason for the trend fall-off is temporary or permanent. How do you do that? Again, focus on the downside risk.

Every situation is different. Some are easier to evaluate than others. If it’s a complicated situation, you must assess the potential downside. Make the most conservative estimates possible and decide if you could still live with the estimated returns.

If you do, your downside is capped, and surprises can only happen on the upside.

I hope you enjoyed Richard Pzena’s learnings as much as I did. I want to finish with one additional point.

When learning from the greats like Joel Greenblatt and Richard Pzena, I think it’s important to utilize what resonates with you and discard what doesn’t.

For example, I think point #2 (Ignore Catalysts) may be smart for large-cap stocks. But I’ve learned that catalysts can be incredibly important for micro-cap stocks and small-cap spin-offs, my areas of focus.

As Bruce Lee said, “Absorb what is useful. Discard what is not. Add what is uniquely your own.”

What investing gurus do you follow? What bits of investing advice have you incorporated into your own personal investing approach?

Rich Howe

Micro-Cap Expert Rich Howe

Rich is a trained economist who brings his decades of investing experience to bear on finding the best micro-cap stocks in the market. Get his picks by subscribing to Cabot Micro-Cap Insider.

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